Friday, November 10, 2006

on being big and gay

i look forward to thanksgiving each year like the comin' of the messiah. okay i exaggerate a bit, but you know. it's a holiday that revolves around FOOD. and other stuff, but you know. Food. not processed crap food, but food made with really fresh ingredients (except those french fried onions, if you use them :) ) and food made love.

this year the boy and i will probably be alone, which is a first for us in a really long time. we usually host a small gathering. we've invited the mcgrady's to come, and they're all for it; but they don't think that either of their cars can make it from maryland. if anyone happens to be in atlanta and is bored and needs a nice, warm, and rather nutty environment to hang out in that day, please swing on by. as usual, we'll have enough food for an army because we love to cook, and we love leftovers even more.

the boy and i have traditions; and if you don't have traditions of your own, i urge you to start some. they're a whole lot of fun and give you something to look forward to for the next year. one of our biggest and gayest traditions is to wake up on thanksgiving morning and drink Nutty Irishmen* and watch the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade while still in our pajamas. the parade is kind of gay, but seeing how the boy and i are kind of evil, we like to watch the Broadway skits that they pepper the parade coverage with on television; not because we are theater-going kind of folk but because it's usually colder than hell in new york that day and those actors are freezing their butts off and we think that's kind of funny. i told you we were evil.

another tradition we started last year is to make creme brulee french toast for breakfast. the thing about creme brulee french toast is that it's so decadent that you really can only eat it once or twice a year. last year we had it for christmas breakfast, and this year the boy says that he also wants it for thanksgiving morning. since we don't sit down for the feast until mid-afternoon, we don't mind a little custard-soaked challah and boozy coffee to start our day with.

i love traditions and am always looking for new ones to begin. my best friend in high school, dawn polk, had a really funny tradition for christmas eve. she had 6 sisters and brothers, and every christmas eve that she could ever remember, the kids all went to McDonald's and their parents stayed home and had shrimp cocktail. patty's family goes to Red Lobster every christmas eve. i think this is pretty great.

i'll end this blurb with something i read in the wine newsletter i subscribe to.

Thanksgiving is the one holiday that has similar meaning and style of
celebration no matter what ethnicity. We all pretty much do the same thing.
And statistically, the number one dish most likely to be served? If you said
turkey you're wrong. How about green-bean casserole.

What sort of wines go with green-bean casserole, volcanos of gravy, cranberry
brick, lime chiffon marshmellow mold, and sweet potato scuffle? Actually, none.

Thanksgiving is for lots of things, but if you open fine wines, make sure it is
during the appetizer. But no matter what you open, the most important thing is
who you are with that day.


* Nutty Irishmen: usually one part Frangelico, one part Bailey's Irish Creme, coffee. Top it off with fresh whipped cream, although if you have a canister of it in the door of your fridge that you've been saving to do whippets with, i'll allow you to use that too.

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